Business Challenge Wave 5

Business Challenge Wave 5

In the fifth wave of the BSD Business Challenge we focus on Working and doing business in BSD. Covid19 has accelerated working from home and more and more organizations are looking for new, flexible office solutions. For this wave, we are therefore looking for ideas, plans and experiments that can help us devise and try out new solutions for this development.

In the Urban Plan for BSD, we have been working since 2017 on the basis of physically bringing living and working together in a more hybrid form. We have approximately 8 hectares of land available for this, divided over the housing plots in BSD. In addition, we have room to develop approx. 4 ha as a concentration 'business park'. When we developed this plan, we didn't know about Covid19 yet. In the meantime, under the influence of this, thinking has accelerated and the following article by McKinsey describes this very aptly:

“Before the pandemic, the idea was that offices were critical to productivity, culture and winning the war for talent. Companies vigorously competed for premium office space in major urban centers around the world, and many focused on solutions that foster collaboration. Densification, open office design, hoteling and coworking was the adage.

But estimates suggest that in early April, 62 percent of working Americans worked from home during the crisis, compared to about 25 percent a few years ago. During the pandemic, many people were surprised by the speed and effectiveness of video conferencing and other digital collaboration technologies. For many, the results were better than expected.

According to research by McKinsey, 80 percent of those surveyed say they enjoy working from home. Forty-one percent say they are more productive than before and 28 percent say they are equally productive. Many employees who have been relieved of long journeys and journeys have found more productive ways to spend that time, enjoyed greater flexibility in reconciling their personal and professional lives, and decided they would rather work at home than in the office. Many organizations believe they can access new talent with fewer local constraints, apply innovative processes to increase productivity, create an even stronger culture and significantly reduce real estate costs.

But is it possible that the satisfaction and productivity people now experience working from home is the product of the social capital built up through countless hours of water-cooler conversations, meetings and social engagements before the outbreak of the crisis? Will corporate cultures and communities erode over time without physical interaction? Are planned and unplanned moments of collaboration disrupted? Will there be less mentorship and talent development? Was working from home only successful because it is considered temporary, not permanent? ”

Living, working and doing business

In light of the BSD ambition, in Wave 5 of our Business Challenge, we pay extra attention to ideas, plans and experiments that can help us to come up with and try out new solutions for this development. This may therefore concern combinations of living and working at home, flexible (semi) local temporary and flexible office solutions, possibly combined with other functions in BSD (logistics, mobility, etc.), but also ideas for filling the 4 ha business park in a BSD manner. and opportunities to stimulate and advance new entrepreneurship. Keep in mind that all proposals must confirm themselves to our innovation ambitions as laid down in the Q-Book, which you can find on our website.

Read more about the Business Challenge

 

52 temporary homes from mHome

52 temporary homes from mHome


Social and sustainable 

The scoop for the temporary homes in Brainport Smart District is for mHome. This Nijmegen developer will start installing 52 temporary homes at the end of 2021. The ‘mHomes’ will remain in the area for 15 years. Curious about these homes? Then watch the report (in Dutch) by RTL Doe Maar Duurzaam about BSD and mHome or read on.

Building with fixed blocks

The mHomes are modular and easy to connect to each other. “You can compare the mHomes with Lego bricks. We combine a high degree of standardization with flexibility and creativity. By cleverly combining the “Lego blocks”, there are a surprising number of possibilities. But because we always use the same blocks, it remains affordable,” says Bernd Hendriksen, project leader of mHome.

Durable

The homes of mHome are made of mainly circular and post-growth ecological (bio-based) building materials. In addition, the mHomes are easily reusable and repositionable. For example, from visitor center to housing or from homes to an office.

Stacked construction

In BSD come 52 mHomes. These are placed stacked ranging from 1, 2 and 3 high. The result is a playful whole. There is plenty of space around the houses for communal greenery and a pond. for example, a communal green(t)e garden.

Affordable and inclusive

These first temporary homes in BSD are medium-priced rental homes and homes for social housing. Six homes are rented out to ORO clients. In this way, mHome contributes to BSD’s ambition to become a neighborhood for everyone. The other 46 homes are in the social rent and affordable rent price range.

Do you want to live in a mHome?

mHome does not just want to offer a home, but also wants to build the living environment together with the future residents. The Participation program line is therefore one of the program lines in which mHome aims to excel. For example, mHome wants to work on a community and, for example, give substance to the communal (outdoor) spaces together with residents. After the summer of 2021, this participation process will be further elaborated by the mHome team together with Twinstone and BSD. The recruitment of residents will then start in the fall. It is already possible to indicate an interest in this project using the form on this page. Indicate that you are interested in ‘Temporary housing’. You will receive more information about the follow-up after the summer. 

EIGENAAR PROJECT

mHome

PARTNERS

ORO | Twinstone

PROGRAMMALIJNEN

Participatie | Circulaire wijk

MEER INFORMATIE

Connect SME: Cross-border collaboration

Connect SME: Cross-border collaboration

What does ConnectSME stand for?

Brainport Smart District is one of the six testing grounds in the Netherlands and Flanders that participate in ConnectSME. The aim is to stimulate innovation trajectories of SMEs and SMEs to bring their innovations to the market faster and thus maximize CO2 reductions.

In order to achieve the European climate targets, it is important that sustainable technological innovations find their way to the market more quickly. For many SMEs and SMEs developing sustainable technologies in Flanders and the Netherlands, it is difficult to bridge the so-called ‘Vallei of Death’. A significant amount of capital is often required to bring the innovative product to commercial scale, while potential customers do not yet dare to invest in the innovative products. In addition, it is important to select the right technologies that will maximize CO2 reductions in the long term.

How does it work?

With a consortium of six living labs and two clusters, the ConnectSME project facilitates demonstration projects for sustainable technological innovations in Flanders and the South of the Netherlands. The living labs provide a development and demonstration environment for innovative technologies, according to a user-oriented, open innovation ecosystem.

Selected SMEs and SMEs receive vouchers with which they receive advice and the opportunity to demonstrate and develop their innovation in this physical test environment. By removing barriers to cross-border cooperation, ConnectSME wants to improve the market introduction opportunities of innovative technologies in the border region of Flanders-Netherlands.

Who can participate?

The ConnectSME project focuses on Flemish and Dutch SMEs and SMEs.

Do you recognize yourself in the points below?

Then be sure to register:

  • You are active in the border region. More information at www.grensregio.eu
  • You develop technology that promotes CO2 reduction and climate objectives
  • With your technology you focus on energy or is related to it
  • You have already developed your innovation and are looking for a way to scale it
  • Your innovation is new in the border region

Read more?

Download the flyer about ConnectSME with more information or contact Martijn de Kort

EIGENAAR PROJECT

ConnectSME

PARTNERS

Thorsite (VITO), Snowball en Green Energy Park in Vlaanderen

The Green Village (TU Delft), Future Energy Lab Metalot (TU Eindhoven) en Brainport Smart District in Nederland

PROGRAMMALIJNEN

Wijk met energie

Data Governance

verantwoord omgaan met data

Data Governance

Data Governance: Responsible use of data within Brainport Smart District

How do we handle data in a safe and responsible manner? Partly as a result of the discussions surrounding the Corona App, data use is increasingly the subject of a broad public discussion. Within Brainport Smart District (BSD) we have been working on the subject for some time, with the question in mind: how are we going to give residents of BSD maximum say in the use of data in their smart residential and working district?

verantwoord omgaan met data

Project Data Governance
During the BSD Business Network Event on June 25, 2020, Cathalijne Dortmans, alderman in Helmond and chairman of the Brainport Smart District Foundation, discussed extensively how we want to ensure that the use of data in BSD takes place in the most responsible way with maximum control for residents. Peter Portheine, director of the BSD Foundation, explained that the subject of data is already a high priority in the programming of Brainport Smart District. A separate Data Governance project has been set up with the objective of guaranteeing the responsible use of data and technology.

Residents are not part of a tech company’s experiment
What makes Brainport Smart District unique is that the area to be developed is both literally and figuratively a greenfield. BSD is a neighborhood in the making: both the houses and the (digital) infrastructure are still under development. It is also unique that BSD arose from a collaboration between government organizations and knowledge institutions and that we are not affiliated with one or a few tech companies. This is often the case in other places where experiments are carried out with smart cities or districts.

Principles and agreements in a Data Manifest
BSD is made together with several companies. We have drawn up a Data Manifesto (document in Dutch) to conclude cooperation agreements with these companies. It lays down about twenty principles and intentions regarding the processing and use of data and the access to and use of the digital infrastructure. Parties participating in the development of BSD are asked to make maximum effort to realize the ambitions of the Data Manifesto. By entering into a collaboration agreement with BSD, they are also expected to endorse the ambitions in the Data Manifesto.

Moral Compass
The Data Manifesto is a living document. We are innovating and not everything can be determined in advance. What is state of the art technology today may be obsolete tomorrow. One of the tasks of the Data Advisory Team (formerly the Data Governance Board) is to ensure that we conduct the right discussions regarding the use of technology and how we continue to act within the framework of the law.

But it’s not just about technical and legal issues. It often concerns issues of a completely different order. For example: will we behave differently if we know that our behavior can be monitored? What are the conditions under which technology can be used and who determines these conditions? Does the end justify all means? This requires the deployment of external experts in the field of ethics, sociology, behavioral sciences, big data, etc. By setting up an Ethics team in which all these disciplines are represented, we at BSD have a moral compass that ensures that we are on the right course keep sailing.

Ethics Team and Data Advisory Team

The Ethics Team has now been assembled and all members were appointed by the Foundation Board in December 2020. The appointment of the Data Advisory Team will take place shortly.

Contact
We will keep you regularly informed about the progress of the Data Governance project via the newsletter, our social media and on BrandevoortLAB. For questions and comments, please contact Carlien Roodink, projectleader Data Governance.

EIGENAAR PROJECT

Brainport Smart District

PARTNERS

PROGRAMMALIJNEN

 Digitale wijk

College approves agreement with mHome

College approves agreement with mHome

We have written about mHome before, but it is now final: the developer from Nijmegen will develop the first 52 temporary homes in BSD. On Tuesday 20 July, the Municipal Executive of Helmond formally confirmed this.

Social & sustainable
The homes of mHome are made of mainly circular and post-growth ecological (bio-based) building materials. In addition, the mHomes are easily reusable and repositionable. This means that these homes fit in well with BSD’s ambitions in the field of circularity. In addition, mHome wants to excel in the Participation program line. mHome does not just want to offer a home, but also wants to build the living environment together with the future residents. For example, mHome wants to work on a community and, for example, give substance to the communal (outdoor) spaces together with residents. This participation process will be further shaped after the summer of 2021. The recruitment of residents will then start in the fall.

Online innovation marketplace ready

Online innovation marketplace ready

We already lifted a corner of the veil during our last networking event. Now BSD’s Online Innovation Marketplace is almost ready. On marktplaats.brainportsmartdistrict.nl we bring innovative projects and services to the attention and supply and demand can find each other. We cordially invite our partners to create an account and place a question or offer. The marketplace is still under development and will be further developed, partly on the basis of feedback from users.

The marketplace was developed by COMP-IT-AUT, a company from Helmond where people with an autism spectrum disorder find meaningful daytime activities. The marketplace is also available in English.

The foundation of the smart neighborhood in Helmond is being laid

The foundation of the smart neighborhood in Helmond is being laid

Development and construction of innovative infrastructure Brainport Smart District awarded to consortium of KWS, Baas B.V. and Spectral. You don’t think about it every day, but above and below ground lies a complete infrastructure of roads, cables and pipelines. This infrastructure must also be constructed in Brainport Smart District (BSD), in order to move traffic, energy, water and data from A to B in the district and to achieve the ambitious goal of the smartest district. After a tender procedure, a consortium of the organizations KWS, Baas B.V. and Spectral emerged as the winner. Together with residents, knowledge institutions, governments and other partners, they will work on the construction of the innovative infrastructure in BSD.

Getting started in a construction team

KBS, BSD and various other partners from the quadruple helix are now continuing together in a construction team. “In the coming months we will immediately get to work in working groups, in which the (future) resident will also be involved,” Eric Vugs says enthusiastically on behalf of KBS. “In the working groups we are looking for what the optimal energy system, water system, data infrastructure and mobility system should look like for the residential areas of the future. We are looking for answers to questions such as: ‘What does the smart energy grid look like? Will there be a separate greywater system? How do we optimally organize mobility hubs? Can we use the lampposts as a place for smart sensors?’. These are all examples of the kind of issues that will be tackled here.” In addition to BSD and KBS, universities, various authorities, water boards, Brabant Water, Enexis, Fontys, residents and the security region will participate in the working groups.

Learning for the future

The fully joint design and realization of innovative, private infrastructure in this way is unique. “We expect that this will mean that here, in BSD, we can set the new standard for, for example, the energy system and water system of the future. By doing it together, we show that we are also involved in process innovation in our smart neighbourhood,” adds Alderman Cathalijne Dortmans. The aim is to clarify where the current legislation and regulations are hindering and to come up with better solutions in order to realize the ambition to become the smartest neighbourhood. The first result of the efforts of the construction team will become visible at the end of the year, when construction of the first 52 temporary homes in BSD starts.

About consortium KBS
Three companies work together in the consortium, all of which have proven to be frontrunners in their field and continuously innovate. They combine their knowledge in the field of the various infrastructures and energy systems, both underground and above ground.

KWS is the market leader in road construction in the Netherlands. But building roads isn’t all they do. All kinds of specialisms are in-house. From earthmoving to sound-proof constructions and from hydraulic engineering to sewer renovation. Every day, KWS works with 2,000 colleagues on the accessibility and quality of life in the Netherlands. Every day we take steps towards our sustainability mission: 100% circular infrastructure and maximum contribution to a better quality of life.

Spectral is an Amsterdam-based technology company that is active as an end-to-end system integrator in the smart energy domain. Based on the impact-driven mission to accelerate the energy transition, they develop integrated platform solutions for realizing and scaling up smart grids, smart assets and smart buildings. In BSD, Spectral is building a smart grid that connects all energy producers and consumers in the district. As a result, the energy is used more locally and sustainable energy can be used.

Since 1898 Baas B.V. focuses on the realization of underground infrastructures and electrical systems. In a large part of the Netherlands we take care of the construction of distribution networks for electricity, gas, drinking water and internet for network operators and utility parties. With the realization of 20,000 connections for new construction, large-scale renovation of electricity and gas networks and the installation of 100,000 smart meters per year, Baas B.V. one of the larger infrastructure contractors. From design to maintenance and troubleshooting. With regard to the energy transition, Baas is committed to developing (private) energy infrastructure, so that companies and residents can use, distribute and store their own generated energy locally. The traditional model of centrally generated and nationally distributed energy is changing towards locally generated and used energy. Together with 650 permanent employees, Baas works on a reliable infrastructure every day.

 

Business Challenge Wave 5

Business Challenge Wave 5

In the fifth wave of the BSD Business Challenge we focus on Working and doing business in BSD. Covid19 has accelerated working from home and more and more organizations are looking for new, flexible office solutions. For this wave, we are therefore looking for ideas, plans and experiments that can help us devise and try out new solutions for this development.

In the Urban Plan for BSD, we have been working since 2017 on the basis of physically bringing living and working together in a more hybrid form. We have approximately 8 hectares of land available for this, divided over the housing plots in BSD. In addition, we have room to develop approx. 4 ha as a concentration 'business park'. When we developed this plan, we didn't know about Covid19 yet. In the meantime, under the influence of this, thinking has accelerated and the following article by McKinsey describes this very aptly:

“Before the pandemic, the idea was that offices were critical to productivity, culture and winning the war for talent. Companies vigorously competed for premium office space in major urban centers around the world, and many focused on solutions that foster collaboration. Densification, open office design, hoteling and coworking was the adage.

But estimates suggest that in early April, 62 percent of working Americans worked from home during the crisis, compared to about 25 percent a few years ago. During the pandemic, many people were surprised by the speed and effectiveness of video conferencing and other digital collaboration technologies. For many, the results were better than expected.

According to research by McKinsey, 80 percent of those surveyed say they enjoy working from home. Forty-one percent say they are more productive than before and 28 percent say they are equally productive. Many employees who have been relieved of long journeys and journeys have found more productive ways to spend that time, enjoyed greater flexibility in reconciling their personal and professional lives, and decided they would rather work at home than in the office. Many organizations believe they can access new talent with fewer local constraints, apply innovative processes to increase productivity, create an even stronger culture and significantly reduce real estate costs.

But is it possible that the satisfaction and productivity people now experience working from home is the product of the social capital built up through countless hours of water-cooler conversations, meetings and social engagements before the outbreak of the crisis? Will corporate cultures and communities erode over time without physical interaction? Are planned and unplanned moments of collaboration disrupted? Will there be less mentorship and talent development? Was working from home only successful because it is considered temporary, not permanent? ”

Living, working and doing business

In light of the BSD ambition, in Wave 5 of our Business Challenge, we pay extra attention to ideas, plans and experiments that can help us to come up with and try out new solutions for this development. This may therefore concern combinations of living and working at home, flexible (semi) local temporary and flexible office solutions, possibly combined with other functions in BSD (logistics, mobility, etc.), but also ideas for filling the 4 ha business park in a BSD manner. and opportunities to stimulate and advance new entrepreneurship. Keep in mind that all proposals must confirm themselves to our innovation ambitions as laid down in the Q-Book, which you can find on our website.

Read more about the Business Challenge

 

Construction of innovative and affordable home in BSD has started

Construction of innovative and affordable home in BSD has started

Housing corporation Woonbedrijf, Team CASA and the Eindhoven construction company Hurks have started the construction of CASA 1.0. These innovative and affordable homes are the first homes to be built in the Brainport Smart District. CASA 1.0 consists of a total of 3 affordable social rental homes: an apartment with 1 bedroom and 2 studios. The houses are very sustainable, for which new innovations and technologies are used that were devised by the TU / e students of Team CASA. The homes will be ready in the spring of 2021.

 

CASA stands for Comfortable, Affordable, Sustainable Alternative. The goal is to build a comfortable, affordable and sustainable alternative to social rental housing. This idea came from Antoine Post, a Physics student at TU / e and manager of Team CASA. He heard a lot about sustainable developments, but did not see this reflected in average homes. He had ideas about designing a sustainable home and found other students who were happy to join. For example, they designed CASA 1.0 and together with Hurks brought the plans to a ready-to-implement design.

First home in BSD
CASA 1.0 is the first home in Brainport Smart District. In BSD, the latest insights and techniques in the field of participation, health, data, mobility, energy and circularity are used to create a sustainable and beautiful living environment. The development of BSD is a co-creation process between residents, professionals and other stakeholders. “With the realization of CASA 1.0. a number of BSD’s ambitions come together. Government, education, business and residents have developed the house together. This house shows that BSD is becoming a neighborhood for everyone, ”said project alderman Cathalijne Dortmans, who is also involved as chairman of the BSD foundation.

More information about this project is available on the Team CASA website

 

 

 

Brainport Smart District in The New York Times!

Brainport Smart District in The New York Times!

Did you see it? The New York Times in conversation with future resident Hans Moerkerk, Ben van Berkel (UNStudio) and Cathalijne Dortmans about Brainport Smart District. About living in a living lab and the challenges that go with it: “I realize we are going to live in an experiment,” Mr. Moerkerk said. “Some ideas might not work out the way we expect.”

Now available online in The New York Times and printed in the international edition!